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shoes on a power line

Due to the dodginess of my phone, the subject of this picture may be unclear. Just in case you can’t see properly, I’ll tell you that the subject of this photo is shoes. Actually, let me be more specific. The subject of this photo is two pairs of shoes. Hanging over a power line.

“How strange,” you may think. “Oh well, at least you got to see it before they got taken down.”

I’m sorry, misguided visitor. This is no isolated incident. All over my suburb, a campaign rages to throw everyone’s shoes over the power lines. Almost wherever I walk, I see these shoes tied together, hanging above the street like lynch victims. What is the purpose of this? What do the throwers achieve? You can’t tell me that they get a thrill from throwing shoes around like this!

The abundance of high-flying shoes in my neighbourhood leaves me to ponder one (important) question, though. Is this actually a massive thing worldwide that I must have been living under a rock to miss, or is it just my suburb being weird and wonderful as always?

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7 Comments

  1. In that case, then, there are at least three houses within 100m of mine which sell drugs. And the only place (it’s a flat) I know sells drugs hasn’t had the shoes out the front that I can recall.

    Maybe I’ll have to watch more carefully, though.

  2. Apparently! At least it’s a peaceful hotbed, though… 🙂

  3. There’s an urban legend floating around (or, at least I assume it’s an urban legend) that shoes on the powerlines indicate that there’s a drug house nearby. That way, any junkies who see the shoes can hook themselves up with what they need.

    Whether or not this is true…

  4. I really can’t visualise myself having a blast throwing my shoes away like that, though. Just how fun do these people find it?

  5. Sounds like you live in a hotbed of drug activity!

  6. There’s even been a term coined to describe this – “shoefiti”! I’ve also heard the “drug house” explanation. Perhaps that’s how it started in the US, but I see so many of them that I seriously doubt that as the intention here in Australia. I think it’s just the sheer joy of flinging footwear.

  7. yeah, my mum also told me that meant that there where drugs being sold if there are shoes on the powerlines.


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